language comprehension and memory
 
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The course Introduction to Psychology Science emphasizes a research-based approach to the study of human behavior. One of the key ideas to learn from the course is that the advancement of scientific understanding in psychology depends, in part, upon the active support of people who chose to participate in research studies. For this reason, it is important that people know about their rights as research participants and voluntarily agree to do so. This process known as "providing informed consent." Course credit is provided so that students confirm that they have learned about their rights as research participants and understand how research participation contributes to the advancement of scientific understanding. You can receive research credit either by participating in experiments or by completing an alternative assignment. The alternative assignment is to read a short article on current findings in psychology and submit a short review of the article to show that you read and understood the content, especially regarding the role of research participants in hypothesis testing. Your written summary of the article should be 1 page long, with 1.5 line spacing and 1 inch margins. One article review fulfills one course credit, and you can review up to 2 articles. The selected articles can be downloaded below. Your written assignments (for the Autumn 2014 semester) can be submitted over email to luka@bard.edu, and you should cc your instructor on that email.

Short articles for review (click to download) :

Moreno, S., Bialystok, E., Barac, R., Schellenberg, E.G., Cepeda, N,, & Chau, T. (2011). Short-term music training enhances verbal intelligence and executive function. Psychological Science, 22(11), 1425-1433.

Emberson, L, Lupyan, G., Goldstein, M., & Spivey, M. (2010). Overheard cell-phone conversations: When less speech is more distracting. Psychological Science, 21(10), 1383-1388.

Oishi, S., Kesebir, S., & Diener, E. (2011).  Income inequality and happiness. Psychological Science, 22(9), 1095-1100.